17 May 2014

AMM - October Gallery 15.12.91 Set 2




















AMM

EDDIE PREVOST, percussion
LOU GARE, violin, tenor sax
KEITH ROWE, guitar, electronics
JOHN TILBURY, piano

Second set  45:09

October Gallery, London.  15 December 1991

Maybe this only applies to non-drivers like myself, but have you ever been at a gig/concert when you know you have to leave by a certain time to catch the last train/bus and, as good as the music is, you’d like it to finish, but it doesn’t, it seems to go on forever, even when there was a natural obvious ending five minutes ago?  Well this gig wasn’t like that, not for me anyway. I was getting a lift from the wonderful girl who used to drive to most of the venues around England where I made the recordings I’ve been posting.  (Eternal thanks to her.) No, I was relaxed, knowing I could hear every last note, scrape and thrum.  But John Tilbury, on the other hand, needed to catch his train and left halfway through this second set.  Thus turning AMM into the Masters of Disorientation I suppose.

Thank you to the six people who kindly left a comment to set 1.  Your encouragement gives me a sense of purpose.
 
@Maready, Lou Gare was the opposite of a front-man.  He would stand, or walk around at the back of the rest of the group.  I only met him a few times but he came across as a very humble, gentle and thoroughly nice man.  It’s a shame we don’t hear more of him.  It’s well worth hearing the AMM albums made when it was just the duo of Prevost and Gare:  ‘At the Roundhouse’ (Anomalous Records) and ‘To Here and Back Again’ (Matchless Recordings).  Also his solo (tenor) album ‘No Strings Atttached’ (Matchless Recordings).  Obviously ALL the AMM albums are worth hearing.

Lou Gare on YouTube 




18 comments:

Andy said...

Rapidshare
Gamefront
1Fichier

sandor essedy said...

Six encouragments, it's a must. Do not impressive with. Glad to listen this kind of music; thanks a lot.

wightdj said...

Beautiful, thanks.

Almost 40,zo? said...

I married the girl who wanted to borrow my Coltrane albums, because I hated lending out records after they always came back scratched up...Ironically her brother, my future bro-in-law, scratched up all HER vinyl![Of course, no-one called it that 40 years ago!

Wallofsound said...

Ta

Tantris said...

Thanks, Andy. I'm enjoying your choice of image as much as the music.

Howard said...

Thanks Andy,
The Pictures, The Stories and the Music are very much appreciated.

Bernd said...

Hello Andy!

Many thanks!

Colin Green said...

Love the story about John Tilbury having to leave to catch his train

And do you have the contact details of the girl who used to drive to all the gigs? I've been looking for a woman like that for years :-)

Many thanks for both these sets.

Lou-zo said...

Thanks for the emphasis a bit on Lou Gare, one of those unsung cats...

Vitko said...

Thank you, Andy.

chrisc said...

Thank you Andy. Your recordings are always a pleasure to listen to.

john said...

Thanks, great stuff. Also I concur that Lou Gare's 'No Strings Attached' is an outstanding album.

maready said...

Thanks so much for SET 2 and thanks for the words about Lou Gare. What I meant to say about Gare was that since AMMMusic so quickly jettisoned any jazz roots at the turn of the 60s, I was often unable to square Gare's contributions when he sat in with the group in later years. Unlike the others, he continued to play his a recognizably 'jass' instrument in an idiomatic fashion. I often feel similarly about Tilbury in the trio years: occasionally I feel as if his (always beautiful) post-Webernian/Feldmanesque figurating is taking place off in a world of its own.

But the actual point I was trying to make was that I recently had been listening a lot to 'The Nameless Uncarved Block' and your earlier post with Gare (and Ian Mitchell) and had experienced an epiphany of sorts --- I'm now thinking that the AMM music made in the late 80s - mid 90s is particularly interesting when it is made by a quartet, with either Gare or Rohan de Saram as a kind of 'productive foreign element' in the way their recognizably soloistic and expressive musical contributions duck and wriggle and weave through the somewhat monolithic ('laminal') textures of Rowe/Prevost/Tilbury, sometimes showing up as a figure on an abstract ground; sometimes appearing in the distance somewhere 'behind' that ground (interesting your mention of Gare's actual physical position at the rear of the stage!)

Since the Rowe and the de Saram quartet AMMs are only represented by one Matchless CD release a piece, I'm very grateful to you for the live performances and the context they provide. (For these and all the earlier --- Maida Vale, Bielfeld, 'Unknown Venue' etc.)

maready said...

Beautiful and appropriate pictures too!

JC said...

Thanks again. As many I don;t always say it each post but this is rather a monumental documentation you've made and have been kindly sharing here. A lot of this music is totally new to me and just a few names I may recognize and have heard a few things from somewhere or other and many I may not have heard at all. To discover this whole scene and get a sense of how it came together and to hear a number of permutations of it in development and bloom is really quite remarkable. Thank you kindly.

I get to do a little of that these days where I am but frankly am not able to get out to much. There's really a lot of great music still being made somewhat off the radar. To me these cultures are of a place and time and having seem a few of them (in significantly different genres) flower then fade I think it is truly a gift that anyone documents whatever parts of them they are able to. It is rare the musicians are able to get much of it down on releases and sometimes those don't really capture the spirit of what was happening in the day to day encounters that really form the glue that brings together and realizes a particular aesthetic.

Andy said...

NEW LINK:
ADrive

francisco santos said...

BIG THX!...