8 November 2012

Otomo Yoshihide Trio (+Itaru Oki)- Maison de la culture du Japon a Paris Sep 27th 2008

Taking on board certain points raised in email exchanges/ critiques ,
that we are too focused on the old, somewhat anally fixated on excavating the obscure past ,through endlessly fetishizing vinyl objects which are the ever present talismen of socially retarded middle class white males,and their attendant painfully self conscious intellectual pretensions....(to the detriment and exclusion of the here and now , the fresh , new vibrant and important)

in that spirit here is a concert, i like very much by the Otomo Yoshide trio, a stripped down version of his phenomenal  new Jazz quartet/quintet , (with Veteran trumpteter Itaru Oki as special guest on one piece only)..


(original taper/seeders notes)

Otomo Yoshihide Trio
Maison de la culture du Japon a Paris
Sep 27th 2008

Otomo Yoshihide g
Mizutani Hiroaki b
Yoshigaki Yasuhiro dms
guest Oki Itaru fl,tpt on set 2 track 03 (encore)

Audience MD recording :
Sony ECM-MS907 > Sony MZ-N707 >
HDD > Creative wave studio >
Nero noise reduction > FLAC

Set 1
01 31'21 (starts with "Song for Che" by Charlie Haden)
02 12'39

Set 2
01 17'
02 19'24 ("Lonely Woman" by Ornette Coleman)
03 14'40


PS
I first became aware of Yoshihide through the uniquely eclectic,post Modern Noise rock of 'Ground Zero' in the early 90's, and have been a fan ever since..
Yoshihide has gone on to numerous projects , many such as Filament the unique electro acoustic improv group, with sachiko M and Yoshimitsu Ichiraku, have abandoned known formal,structural and instrumental conventions, using sine wave generators, empty samplers and no input mixing boards
to create light subtly nuanced complex pulsating interlocking drones
...
Yoshihide is also a/(THE)contemporary monster Free Jazz guitarist , surpassing in ferocity and frenetically inventive energy such obvious role models as Masayuki Takayanagi and Sonny Sharrock ..

a note to anyone who likes this, there are many available releases of Yoshihide's  currently available
this is a great place to check out items and to buy from

Other great examples of Yoshihide playing shit hot Guitar in a 'free jazz',idiom are the collaborations with the Thing (Shinjuku Crawl is killer!!!) ,on smalltown supersound, and the Amazing, O.Y,New jazz Quartet Live in Lisbon on Cleanfeed,
S
Enjoy!!



34 comments:

SOTISE said...

Flac https://www.rapidshare.com/files/1685573895/OTTPA.rar

mike said...

thanks a lot for this! I'm not critical of your recent picks, certainly not enough to characterize them as you said, but am very happy to get a Yoshihide set I have not heard. Also, many thanks for the lossless sets!

Nick said...

Thanks!

There's also lots more recent Itaru Oki at

http://www.improvising-beings.com/

bventure said...

Thanks much for this, even though I would have to characterise myself as "too focused on the old, somewhat anally fixated on excavating the obscure past ,through endlessly fetishizing vinyl objects which are the ever present talismen of socially retarded middle class white males,and their attendant painfully self conscious intellectual pretensions...". The only issue I have with the above is whether 'talismen' is really the plural of 'talisman'?

glmlr said...



“… the here and now, the fresh, new, vibrant and important” …

How much of the here and now is important? Of what we consider important today, how much of that will we consider important in 25 or 50 years from now? Otomo Yoshihide?



sotise said...

if Yoshide is remembered in 50 years it will probably be for Filament and the more lower case improv stuff , and not the freejazz , which as enjoyable as it is is like most contemporary free jazz revivalist in nature... Glmlr the modernist project of perpetual innovation and renewal, ended somewhere in the late 70's ,all we are left with is recombination of elements, and the pure joy one finds in the energy of the moment...

glmlr said...

" ...all we are left with is recombination of elements, and the pure joy one finds in the energy of the moment... "

Well said, very true.

IB said...

Harigato, buddies.
Who did this beautiful cover?

SOTISE said...

hi IB, i made the cover(i'm a painter) , brush and brown ink, glad you like it!

IB said...

I really do. That's the kind of design I try to pin down on IB. Especially on the japanese music. Well, we're building an aesthetic :)

Bernie said...

Thank you very much!!!

Bozo the Futurist! said...

Sotise and I think alike much more than not! There really is nothing musically "NEW" these days;just further advances in what is already done, or recombinig them in unusual ways.
What is the last major advancement in [non-electronic]musical instruments? No brand new anything, like a cello, or trumpet, or piano, etc. New instruments need to be invented!
Music may start to taketrform of brain-wave injection of emotions and info in patterns directly imposed on yer brain cells by the "Artiste". This will be an incredibly dangerous time for humanity, with tremendous potential for evil, as well as good. In the meantime I will dig out a good Haydn symphony or 2!
Note that Bozo could not figure out how to correct the obvious mistyping above!

glmlr said...


Bozo, my good clown! I hear what you are saying. But I don’t fully agree. Yes, new instruments would be very interesting BUT who is there to say anything new and creative on them? For example: the piano has been around for centuries, but only recently were we blessed with a Keith Jarrett or a Cecil Taylor, to do new things with it. Likewise Barry Guy who has turned the double-bass inside out. Or Steve Lacy and Evan Parker, the soprano sax. Or Jimi Hendrix, Derek Bailey and John McLaughlin, the guitar. These people, and others, are rare creative artists. That’s all we need - more of them! On any instrument - new or old. It’s the workman who counts, not the tools.


Overly mixed-up Bozo said...

Dear glmlr, Of Course, you are Totally right!, But to me Bechet, and Louis,and Bird and Bud were every bit as exploratory as Brotz, and Evan; to me it is all one long line. The point I didn't make is hard to write down concisely, but the atists of each generation have not only created their own creativity, as it were, but also created the overlying forms of expression:classical, romantic, 12-tone,avant. or swing,bop, hard-bop,free, etc. rock 'n roll, Brit invasion,psych, hard, metal, new-wave, disco, etc. But now everything is bogged down into a post-this and post that mentality.
What will be the next category of music? Not just what will be the next development of a particular type of music [ a la lower case vs. free improv, or free improv. vs. free jazz, seee what the clown means?]
It is much easier to talk about this stuff, that to write it down, it just makes Bozo feel pretentious, and he can hardly even spell!. But Glmlr has the main point right, too !
Just ordered my first album from Improvising-Beings, yeah!!!

SOTISE said...

@glmlr , i wouldn't characterize Jarrett as an innovator at all let alone rate him on the same level as Cecil Taylor, not even close!!!!

an eclectic, stylist who's recordings are patchy and uneven at best , Stanley Cowell,who is comparably eclectic is a far more interesting pianist...

Jarrett is surely one of the most overrated jazz musicians of all time.

Anonymous said...

can you file a mp3 version?

thanks

glmlr said...

@ Sotise: To my ears, the creative difference between Jarrett and Taylor is that Jarrett is willing to go out on a limb and fail or succeed every time he plays, whereas Taylor plays the one song he knows every time he plays. Jarrett takes the risk; Taylor plays it safe. Jarrett fails frequently, Taylor avoids it like the plague.


Bozo the FMP Monster said...

Bozo has 3 words:
"Alexander von Schlippenbach"

sotise said...

Glmlr
are you seriously proposing that the 'standards trio' are taking Risks...
for one thing Cecil Taylor Developed a whole new language for piano, Jarrett is a magpie who wears his influences on his sleeve, whatever he has done he certainly has not created a new pianistic language...

if Cecil is such a one trick pony why do you (me) and every other Cecil fan feel the need to have so many of his records?... i happen to know that you have everything the man has ever done!!!....
why would you have bothered if its so repetitive...


Bozo , yeah Schlipp is Tops ...BUT , lets Face it if CT hadnt happened , the European Free Scene would be very different, if it exited at all , and Schlippenbach was clearly Massively inspired by CT, at the early stage of that scenes developement.

glmlr said...

Hopefully I have the entire recorded output of both men and have listened to it all thoroughly, so as to have some clue of what I’m talking about. I did not mention the Standards trio, only the two individuals.


kinabalu said...

I think the early Cecil taylor sides with Jimmy Lyons and Sunny Murray are essential. The Nefertiti set should be in every serious collection. Mine is a triple lp set on the Revenant label. As for Jarrett, I can't point to anything that really sticks, though the work with Miles Davis and Jan Garbarek are fine with me. I've by and large skipped the solo piano stuff. I'm sure some will find that I've missed out on something.

sotise said...

Oh ,look i like Jarrett by and large , i just don't see him as an innovator , and putting him in the same league with Cecil is Ludicrous.
'Somewhere Before' a trio on Vortex from 1969 is my Favorite Jarrett, its stunning
and there are lots of very good to great ones.,who doesn't like 'Belonging 'eh

glmlr said...

I made a painfully simple observation which has been wildly misconstrued. That Jarrett takes risks, Taylor doesn’t. Nothing more, nothing less.

kinabalu said...

I'm slightly bewildered by the usage of "risk" in this context. One might have thought that someone who is an innovator, that is breaking with convention or accepted ways of doing things, engages in risky behaviour. That is not an unreasonable interpretation of risk. On the other hand, one might argue that there is risk involved in aiming for goals which one is not entirely sure of reaching; namely the risk of failure, whatever these goals might be. That is a fairly trivial observation, valid for anybody engaged in creative work. Given all that, I still find innovation to be more risky because there are fewer precepts to rely on.

glmlr said...

@ Kinabalu: I agree an innovator “engages in risky behaviour”. Does that make him always an innovator? No, once done, the innovation is over, history. The risk-taking and the innovation are not ongoing.

Musical risk-taking on an ongoing, continuing, basis is a more demanding, more perilous activity, more likely to fail by its own nature.

kinabalu said...

Good to see that we are in agreement on innovation and risk. Of course, there is the possibility that what was non-conventional once turns into another convention and creates its own orthodoxy. I think that is what you're driving at and I am in full agreement with that position.

Perhaps the sign of a true non-conventional is one that regards the distinction between convention and non-convention as irrelevant and who is as familiar playing on the inside as on the outside. I find that these types of musicians excite me the most.

Ah So Bozo said...

Lettuce make it clear-this is a helluva show! Wow!

Anonymous said...

Hi

I grabbed so much good stuff from here, thanks !

This is my recording, I'm glad to be somehow a contributor !

Surprisingly good sounding, afair, my deck was under my seat, the MCJP has strong policy !

From my MD recording period, I'm pretty sure I have one of this trio guesting Junji Hirose, will check it out.

Anonymous said...

@sotise : agree with your choice of the Lisbon concert but my own personal favorite is the ONJQ live at Pit Inn on DIW.

sotise said...

Anon thanks so much for recording this , a potent show atmospherically recorded!!
should you want to post here you can contact me by clicking on the zombie!

Anonymous said...

'there’s no success like failure - and failure’s no success at all' … as someone said who might know it

dan-the-man

Anonymous said...

flac is real shit mp3 plizzzzzzzzzzzz

onxidlib said...

Why not take Flac and convert to mp3.........

roberth said...

intersting discussion. but no mentioned that jarret who i like,
basically copied paul bley. by his own admission he listened to an early bley album over a thousand times. jarret's most interesting work with his group with dewey redman
was directly influenced by the work of ornette as well. transferring his approach to piano. the idea that cecil taylor only plays one song that is an uninformed joke at best.
even if it were true it wouldn't matter because what a song it is!!!!
and so on enuff babble from me
robert