5 January 2015

MUJICIAN - BAND ON THE WALL (1989, Set 2)


















PAUL DUNMALL - baritone, tenor, soprano saxophones
KEITH TIPPETT - piano, bells, music box
PAUL ROGERS - bass
TONY LEVIN - drums

1. 36:33
2. 17:55
3. 12:58

Band on the Wall, Manchester.  16th November 1989

Some absolutely gorgeous music from our heroes.
What an amazing group this was!  Enjoy.




19 comments:

Andy said...

Gamefront
1Fichier

Colin Green said...

Many thanks. Yes indeed, and great little venue at the time. I remember a wonderful gig with Marilyn Crispell and Eddie Prevost, the year before their "official" Band on the Wall recording.

Bulkang U. Antibop said...

...a tangent, but i happen to have Crispell and Prevost at The Hawth the year before "the year before!" :-D I can place it in Contributions in the coming days...
That aside, thank you Andy for this post!

cassiber said...

Another outstanding performance! Can you please re-up the show in Nottingham '90 ?

http://inconstantsol.blogspot.ru/2011/10/mujician-nottingham1990.html

Andy said...

Any comments on your thoughts on the music would be appreciated. Thanks. Howard. Danny. Bernd. Vitko. Softnucleus. Miloo...

Anonymous said...

Thanks! Much appreciated.

Danny said...

Hi Andy,

Always great to hear Mujician perform, what a band !
Thanks for posting this. Set 1 soon ?

Vitko said...

Thanks Andy, all is good along with this kind of music :)

Colin Green said...

Crispell/Prevost would be nice, thanks

Bulkang U. Antibop said...

Tippett is in high form. Clear as crystal; real mind-opening, valve-clearing playing. Great to experience. Gratitude, Andy.

chrisc said...

I don't think i can ever get enough of these guys. Thank you for another beauty Andy.

softnucleus said...

I'm really angry with you, Andy. You made us wait util early January 2015 to post this wonderful gig! I'm joking :-)
There are certain moments when it seems there are compositions and structures where instead, I guess, there is only total improvisation...
Am I wrong if I say that this is one the best Mujician performances?
What can I say more? I'm greatly looking forward to Set 1!

Andy said...

@ softnucleus
Thanks for your comment. You're right it's totally improvised. And you're right it sounds like it isn't. I'm not sure why this is so rare in free jazz/improvisation. But here it's a mark of great musical ability, affinity, listening, and creativity. Beautiful eh?

Bulkang U. Antibop said...

I can hear Rogers' empathy coming easier with Dunmall than with Tippett. That wouldn't happen to be you, Andy, hollering at the first pause? :-) I'm sometimes reminded of the Coltrane "classic" Quartet when listening to a Mujician performance, as if there might be a statement there: "Dear John, I'm sure you see now you were free even then, with malleted Elvin and McCoy..." When Levin drops out ~half-hour in...a beautiful airborne stretch. I can see the mystical smile on his tilted head as he might've listened from behind the kit.
But, of course, that was all a warm-up for Part Two! I bet this would've given Jaki Byard a rollicking cold sweat! There Tippett and Rogers are getting together and then the relationship hiccups when Dunmall enters... Levin to the rescue! Heroic vista! These are just such unique group dynamics, however these fellows came together; glass fragments* on a lightbox, dancing colors...
And then, the one-of-a-kind ballad Encore... Andy, were you the one hollering "MORE!" or the one hollering "MORE!?" ...should be ashamed of yourself...
*(runes?)
Need I say, this is "definitely a keeper?!" Good sound, too. Happy guy here!

Andy said...

@ Artybop. Not guilty of hollering. Not here anyway. Thanks for listening and your comment.

Bulkang U. Antibop said...

[I hope you sense I'm just being silly with that old granny "ashamed" bizniss!]
What softnucleus brings up about structural/comp qualities in jazz/improv reminds me of schools of certain fish and birds that move in unison. My thought is that the transient nature of the business of the music, different configurations everywhere, often doesn't allow for enough familiarity for such "unison shifts," the illusion of preordained direction. Of course, there are exceptions. Parker/Lacy's "Chirps" comes to mind. Having a large-scale sculptor like Tippett on board seeing where they've been and where they might go next is certainly a big help toward a compositional quality, too.

Wallofsound said...

I love it when you post gigs I attended. I was a BotW regular at that time. It's wonderful to think that at the moment I thought I was in a here-and-then-gone experience, and now 25 years later I'm experiencing it again.

I'm sure it wasn't me hollering.

JC said...

Thanks again. The GF link (again) seems to have expired before my late arrival...

The structural/composed - spontaneous/free dichotomy is fascinating. It is indeed rare that any can play fully improvised yet display intention (so the result sound like it isn't necessarily totally improvised). I'm convinced that's total magic yet also convinced there are certain musicians who are magicians (though even they can't always quite hit that magic spot and stay there throughout any given evening).

It is I think rooted in a mastery of technique yet also requires an open spirit and a great ability to listen to others (and perhaps even to sense or draw from the spirit of the audience). One approach (which I suspect I've heard many examples of) is just to "blow" freely with whatever comes to mind but that tends to get boring fast without other components to convey some meaning or feeling. The far more challenging approach is to attempt to improvise structure or form and create an interesting conversation or story on the spot. Thought of as a conversation the possibility of improvising spontaneous form can at least be imagined... As noted elsewhere musicians who know each other will often be better at that by virtue of knowing each other, though I've also experienced supreme unity from musicians who had never played together before.

I was fortunate to hear musicians speaking about music, composition and improvisation in workshops last week (Mark Dresser and Tyshawn Sorey in one, and local friend Mark Meadows who lent the conversational metaphor in another). They all provided different insights among points of agreement.

Improvisation is certainly a different sort of skill than playing compositions (which poses unique challenges as well) but there are very few musicians willing and able to freely improvise an entire song, let alone a set. That alone is one aspect that makes total improvisation rare. The other factors bear more on the relative success of those adventures.

It is indeed lovely some examples of these excursions into the outer limits are well documented and preserved. I often think the best examples are in the more conversational open environment of low-key live performances. Something about huge stages and halls or studios can greatly alter the dynamics and limit or inhibit the flow of ideas.

Andy said...

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